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Archaeology

The territory has an extensive equipment archaeological sites, whose characterization is given precisely by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD, which led to a sort of still image on the real life of the Roman towns, which has no equal in the world. The most important sites are the towns of Pompeii, Herculaneum and Torre Annunziata, Boscoreale, Castellammare di Stabia, Sant’Antonio Abate. As evidence of their exceptional character, the ruins of Pompeii, Herculaneum and Oplontis, which attract millions of visitors each year, are considered a World Heritage Site and are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The archaeological site of Herculaneum

The archaeological site of Herculaneum

The archaeological site of Herculaneum is a little gem for historians, archeology lovers and visitors, who retracing the Decumani and Cardi of the ancient Roman center , can relive that far reality, mainly due to the structural integrity of most of the domus and of town’s centers of aggregation. The pyroclastic flow that destroyed the city of Herculaneum in 79 AD following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, had a particular composition, that instead of burning the buildings, it submerged and preserved them over the time.
Among villas, shops, baths, temples and exciting frescoes and mosaics almost intact, the visitor is intrigued by a particular, detectable only in this archaeological site: the casting that followed the eruption has made possible to preserve the plebeian homes, usually placed on the second floor of the market’s shops. These homes are still visible in their entirety, with stairs, floors, and remains of furniture. Among the enchanting ancient discoveries, there is Villa of the Papyri, residence attributed to the noble Lucius Calpurnius Pisone, from these Villa has been possible to recover many priceless archaeological finds. Many artifacts found during the excavations are exposed in a special section of the Archaeological Museum of Naples.

The Poppea Villas in Oplontis

The Poppea Villas in Oplontis

In Torre Annunziata – indicated with the site of Oplontis – has been brought to light one of the richest and most luxurious villas of Roman period (first century BC) presumably belonged to the Gens Poppea and the summer residence of wealthy Pompeian. In more recent years has been excavated and brought to light another imposing Roman building, between the walls of which were found jewelry forged with admirable craft of the goldsmith. UNESCO has designated the archaeological site of Oplontis, as a World Heritage Site. The Villa is located in a privileged site, due to its proximity to the sea, and for its proximity to Pompeii.

The archaeological site of Pompeii

The archaeological site of Pompeii

For the vast extension of the archaeological site and Its outstanding characteristics related to the tragedy that destroyed it, Pompeii is one of the major archaeological sites in the world, where daily life of Roman civilization appears in full, The ancient Pompei covers an area of 44 hectares, divided into nine regions in their turn divided into insulae. Among the buildings the best known is certainly the Villa of the Misteri, nobiliary residence structured with different spaces and salons; what gives the villa a unique charm is the decoration of the luxury saloon, the depiction of the Dionysian Mysteries, complete and discussed painting that unfolds in scenes of great artistry and deeply meaningful between liturgical and mystical.
An important fresco found in Pompeii in 1879 in the House of the Centenary, and preserved in the Archaeological Museum of Naples, portrayed Bacchus and Vesuvius, a sign of harmony between the volcano, the nature and the people before the terrifying eruption of 79 AD.

Stabiae archaeological site

Stabiae archaeological site

Stabiae, today Castellammare di Stabia, was one of the favorite destinations of the Roman patricians, so much that its territory was dotted with several residential villas. Discovered in 1749 by Bourbon excavators, Stabiae, from the outset, distinguished itself as a place of excellence: the exploration of the city, however, lasted only a few years, so much so that in 1782 all excavation activities were moved to Pompeii, so that villas , houses and streets returned below the ground while frescoes, statues and precious objects were collected in the city museum. After the abandonment, in 1800, there were several findings that maintained on the memory of Stabiae: But it was only in 1950 that two villas, Villa San Marco and Villa Arianna, were reported partially to light.
Today the site of Stabiae is at the center of a major international project involving the creation of an archaeological Park.